Home Life Challenges Uncategorized God loves saints and sinners

God loves saints and sinners

Q: What's the point of being good and living a good life here now, since God loves both the saint and the sinner?

A:  This is a great question, and it makes sense to think that, since God is so loving towards all of his children, we can be forgiven just about anything. And it just might be true, that the Father will ultimately forgive even the person who knows enough about him to know his forgiving nature but decides instead to live a life of self-interest, knowing—believing—that all will be forgiven in the end. The very nature of the question begs one to think about what knowing God means, and what the fruits of a relationship with God look like.

So, why would anyone want to live a life of doing whatever they want to do, living it up...? Just because they can? When someone asks that question, to me it implies that they might think that doing the wrong thing will bring some kind of special happiness, and that being "good" is boring and not much fun. And then this makes me think of the Father's will, and how much joy it brings, when we sincerely seek to find it and to do it—how much joy results from having a close relationship with God-within. So many people think that God's will has to be contrary to our human will—that it is somehow not going to be any fun...and that speaks to the sad fact that many people fear God and fear his will.

The whole point of living a good life is that it is what makes us happy in the end. Doing "whatever we want to do" is not a recipe for happiness. and don't we all want to be happy?

"Intellectual self-consciousness can discover the beauty of truth, its spiritual quality, not only by the philosophic consistency of its concepts, but more certainly and surely by the unerring response of the ever-present Spirit of Truth. Happiness ensues from the recognition of truth because it can be acted out; it can be lived. Disappointment and sorrow attend upon error because, not being a reality, it cannot be realized in experience. Divine truth is best known by its spiritual flavor." (2:7.6)

But I guess there are those who have not had the experience of acting out truth, or really knowing God—the ultimate Truth. Maybe there are those who feel that being "bad" and "living it up" (whatever that means...) will bring them some kind of happiness that they feel is missing from their lives. And for them, I am sure that when they stand on the other side they might say "Lord, Lord," and God will draw them into the fold because that is his nature. But to consciously say—well, I can do whatever I want and I know God will forgive me—that is an attitude that seems callous and self-serving to me. Also, not very conducive to growing a good soul—a person who thinks this way might end up pretty misshapen when they do get to the Mansion Worlds, where one's true self emerges for all to see.

I guess when it comes to God, there really is no limit to his love and forgiveness, but there is that little thing called "justice—otherwise known as consequences. Like it says above: "Disappointment and sorrow attend upon error because, not being a reality, it cannot be realized in experience. Divine truth is best known by its spiritual flavor." This is a truth that has to be experienced, and once a person understands this from experience, it is a sure inspiration to do better and be better. To do otherwise sounds a little like cosmic insanity to me...

There are a couple of things in "Life's Toughest Question" that speak to this in some different ways:

Why do the wicked prosper?

Why am I Living"

I hope this reply is of some help to you "

:: Date published:
:: Author: Staff