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As we know from the Urantia Book and other holy books, Jesus was subjected to discrimination during his mortal life on earth.

123:5.7 (1362. 8 ) Nazareth was a caravan way station and crossroads of travel and largely gentile in population; at the same time it was widely known as a center of liberal interpretation of Jewish traditional law. In Galilee the Jews mingled more freely with the gentiles than was their practice in Judea. And of all the cities of Galilee, the Jews of Nazareth were most liberal in their interpretation of the social restrictions based on the fears of contamination as a result of contact with the gentiles. And these conditions gave rise to the common saying in Jerusalem, “Can any good thing come out of Nazareth?”

All of us witness acts of discrimination toward our brothers and sisters in our own comings and goings throughout the world. This news story today in the Chicago Tribune caught my eye as an example of a Jesusonion response to discrimination.

Quote:
A Philadelphia man says he is humiliated and upset after he was briefly stopped from boarding a flight from Chicago when another passenger overheard him speak Arabic, making him uncomfortable.

Pizza shop owner Maher Khalil emigrated from Palestine 15 years ago. He says he had never experienced discrimination before the incident Wednesday at Midway Airport.

"We came to America to have a better life," Khalil explained on Friday. "Everybody in America is from different countries. I'm one of them. I'm an American citizen."

Khalil said he was chatting with a friend while waiting to board a Southwest Airlines flight. When he approached the gate, he said, they were told they couldn't board because another passenger felt uncomfortable.

"We were just chatting, like everybody else," Khalil said in a telephone interview. "I'm like: 'Are you kidding me? Are you serious? Is this a prank or something?'"

Khalil called the police for help, but when they arrived, some passengers assumed it was because the officers were responding to a terrorist threat.

The two men were later allowed to board.

As Khalil walked to his seat at the back of the plane, some were suspicious of a white box he was carrying and asked to see what was inside, he said. To ease the tension, Khalil opened it and shared the baklava he'd bought with a few passengers.


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If before God and the aspect of Heaven we intend benevolence to all in society, then what does it matter if others unjustly think ill of us and show it by their actions?


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Was it a Jesusonian response to react with claims of humiliation and to get upset?

I see a lawsuit brewing.

Jesus was NEVER offended. Even on the cross he forgave his torturers and executioners.

Rather than understand that people can be fearful in such a situation, Khalil chose to make it about him. NOT very Jesusonian.

Did Khalil have enough baklava for all on the plane that he made fearful? No different than bringing a chocolate AK-47 on board and becoming upset that you were arrested.

Cries of discrimination are but an excuse to control others. NOT very Jesusonian. Khalil will probably get a free trip to visit friends in Palestine out of this, at the very least. Good for him. I'll fain a little humiliation for a free trip. But is it really free? Someone pays for it.


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Raymond Benjamins wrote:
If before God and the aspect of Heaven we intend benevolence to all in society, then what does it matter if others unjustly think ill of us and show it by their actions?


I agree. Those who hate are only harming themselves.


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MannyC wrote:
Was it a Jesusonian response to react with claims of humiliation and to get upset?

I see a lawsuit brewing.

Jesus was NEVER offended. Even on the cross he forgave his torturers and executioners.


Jesus was "indignant" (a synonym for offended) in the incident in paper 173 that resulted in the cleansing of the temple. Jesus did not passively stand by, he reacted in response to his emotion on that occasion.

MannyC wrote:
Rather than understand that people can be fearful in such a situation, Khalil chose to make it about him. NOT very Jesusonian.

Did Khalil have enough baklava for all on the plane that he made fearful? No different than bringing a chocolate AK-47 on board and becoming upset that you were arrested.

Cries of discrimination are but an excuse to control others. NOT very Jesusonian. Khalil will probably get a free trip to visit friends in Palestine out of this, at the very least. Good for him. I'll fain a little humiliation for a free trip. But is it really free? Someone pays for it.


They were not so fearful as to refuse his offering of food. If he was the dangerous person they had assumed he was, wouldn't the food be poisoned or filled with razor blades hidden amongst the delicious honey-coated walnuts? They overcame their paranoia pretty quickly when pastry was on the line. :badgrin:


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Agon D. Onter wrote:
Jesus was "indignant" (a synonym for offended) in the incident in paper 173 that resulted in the cleansing of the temple. Jesus did not passively stand by, he reacted in response to his emotion on that occasion.


You misunderstand how the word "indignant" is used in TUB. It is not taking offense, for Jesus was defenseless to the end.

159:5.10 Jesus did not advocate the practice of negative submission to the indignities of those who might purposely seek to impose upon the practitioners of nonresistance to evil, but rather that his followers should be wise and alert in the quick and positive reaction of good to evil to the end that they might effectively overcome evil with good. Forget not, the truly good is invariably more powerful than the most malignant evil. The Master taught a positive standard of righteousness: “Whosoever wishes to be my disciple, let him disregard himself and take up the full measure of his responsibilities daily to follow me.” And he so lived himself in that “he went about doing good.” And this aspect of the gospel was well illustrated by many parables which he later spoke to his followers. He never exhorted his followers patiently to bear their obligations but rather with energy and enthusiasm to live up to the full measure of their human responsibilities and divine privileges in the kingdom of God.

An offended person would not react positively to evil, as Jesus did. Did Khalil disregard himself? NO! He made himself out to be the victim!


Agon D. Onter wrote:
They were not so fearful as to refuse his offering of food. If he was the dangerous person they had assumed he was, wouldn't the food be poisoned or filled with razor blades hidden amongst the delicious honey-coated walnuts? They overcame their paranoia pretty quickly when pastry was on the line.


Khalil did not have enough Baklava for all on the plane and thus was discriminatory with his generosity. Did you think that because there were no razor blades in the baklava that Khalil gets brownie points to his credit? And then you go on to accuse the passengers of paranoia. Perhaps they should receive free mediation or psychiatric help, paid by you. I am a medical doctor and never knew that pastries can cure someone of paranoia. Perhaps I should do a controlled, double blind study to see if this is true.

Agon, I must say that you cleverly dissimulate when the discussion turns sour for you. :badgrin:


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MannyC wrote:
Agon D. Onter wrote:
Jesus was "indignant" (a synonym for offended) in the incident in paper 173 that resulted in the cleansing of the temple. Jesus did not passively stand by, he reacted in response to his emotion on that occasion.


You misunderstand how the word "indignant" is used in TUB. It is not taking offense, for Jesus was defenseless to the end.


173:1.6 (1890.1) As Jesus was about to begin his address, two things happened to arrest his attention. At the money table of a near-by exchanger a violent and heated argument had arisen over the alleged overcharging of a Jew from Alexandria, while at the same moment the air was rent by the bellowing of a drove of some one hundred bullocks which was being driven from one section of the animal pens to another. As Jesus paused, silently but thoughtfully contemplating this scene of commerce and confusion, close by he beheld a simple-minded Galilean, a man he had once talked with in Iron, being ridiculed and jostled about by supercilious and would-be superior Judeans; and all of this combined to produce one of those strange and periodic uprisings of indignant emotion in the soul of Jesus.

173:1.7 (1890.2) To the amazement of his apostles, standing near at hand, who refrained from participation in what so soon followed, Jesus stepped down from the teaching platform and, going over to the lad who was driving the cattle through the court, took from him his whip of cords and swiftly drove the animals from the temple. But that was not all; he strode majestically before the wondering gaze of the thousands assembled in the temple court to the farthest cattle pen and proceeded to open the gates of every stall and to drive out the imprisoned animals. By this time the assembled pilgrims were electrified, and with uproarious shouting they moved toward the bazaars and began to overturn the tables of the money-changers. In less than five minutes all commerce had been swept from the temple. By the time the near-by Roman guards had appeared on the scene, all was quiet, and the crowds had become orderly; Jesus, returning to the speaker’s stand, spoke to the multitude: “You have this day witnessed that which is written in the Scriptures: ‘My house shall be called a house of prayer for all nations, but you have made it a den of robbers.’”

Nope. Not "defenseless". It is you who misunderstand the book, MannyC.


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Agon D. Onter wrote:
MannyC wrote:
Agon D. Onter wrote:
Jesus was "indignant" (a synonym for offended) in the incident in paper 173 that resulted in the cleansing of the temple. Jesus did not passively stand by, he reacted in response to his emotion on that occasion.


You misunderstand how the word "indignant" is used in TUB. It is not taking offense, for Jesus was defenseless to the end.


173:1.6 (1890.1) As Jesus was about to begin his address, two things happened to arrest his attention. At the money table of a near-by exchanger a violent and heated argument had arisen over the alleged overcharging of a Jew from Alexandria, while at the same moment the air was rent by the bellowing of a drove of some one hundred bullocks which was being driven from one section of the animal pens to another. As Jesus paused, silently but thoughtfully contemplating this scene of commerce and confusion, close by he beheld a simple-minded Galilean, a man he had once talked with in Iron, being ridiculed and jostled about by supercilious and would-be superior Judeans; and all of this combined to produce one of those strange and periodic uprisings of indignant emotion in the soul of Jesus.

173:1.7 (1890.2) To the amazement of his apostles, standing near at hand, who refrained from participation in what so soon followed, Jesus stepped down from the teaching platform and, going over to the lad who was driving the cattle through the court, took from him his whip of cords and swiftly drove the animals from the temple. But that was not all; he strode majestically before the wondering gaze of the thousands assembled in the temple court to the farthest cattle pen and proceeded to open the gates of every stall and to drive out the imprisoned animals. By this time the assembled pilgrims were electrified, and with uproarious shouting they moved toward the bazaars and began to overturn the tables of the money-changers. In less than five minutes all commerce had been swept from the temple. By the time the near-by Roman guards had appeared on the scene, all was quiet, and the crowds had become orderly; Jesus, returning to the speaker’s stand, spoke to the multitude: “You have this day witnessed that which is written in the Scriptures: ‘My house shall be called a house of prayer for all nations, but you have made it a den of robbers.’”

Nope. Not "defenseless". It is you who misunderstand the book, MannyC.


Nope. You continue to misunderstand, Agon. Jesus did not engage in self-defense. Jesus engaged in the defense of OTHERS. He did not make it about himself. You take offense to my posts because you make it about you and feel attacked, whereas I make it about others. The brotherhood is not about self-centeredness. Read the quotes you provided carefully and you will see, if you will.


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MannyC wrote:
You take offense to my posts because you make it about you and feel attacked, whereas I make it about others. The brotherhood is not about self-centeredness. Read the quotes you provided carefully and you will see, if you will.


I am not offended, Manny. Pick your battles elsewhere.


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Agon D. Onter wrote:
MannyC wrote:
You take offense to my posts because you make it about you and feel attacked, whereas I make it about others. The brotherhood is not about self-centeredness. Read the quotes you provided carefully and you will see, if you will.


I am not offended, Manny. Pick your battles elsewhere.


Not a battle, Agon. Those are your words. BTW, are you sending me away to my room?


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Greetings,

Agon D. Onter wrote:
Those who hate are only harming themselves.


I'm wondering, in regards to this case concerning the Arabic speaking, Palestinian, pizza shop owner carrying the Greek baklava onto a plane: what's the difference between fear and hate?

I see the concern of other travelers a symptom of fear. Fear is not hate, and to label it as such is irrational. Everyone is told that if they see or hear something to say something. The person who spoke up was doing his/her duty. It was actually courageous and the only way to assuage fear - to deal with it head on.

Fear must be dealt with because unremitting fear will eventually lead to hating the cause of that fear, if the cause can be identified. If the cause of fear can't be identified, fear becomes anxiety and anxiety leads to neurosis. Right now we are suffering from national neurosis because the fears of the nation have not been dealt with and the cause can be hard to identify. But it is not hate yet. I say yet, because it is not being dealt with effectively. We will know that it has become actual hate if we start to see Muslims rounded up and made to wear the crescent moon on their clothing; if we see them put into ghettos; and worst of all, a desire to eliminate them emerges - then that would be hate, horrible hate, and we all know how that story goes. God forbid it ever be repeated.

People have a legitimate reason to fear some things. Boarding a plane while speaking Arabic in this day and age is fear inducing to any rational person. Whether or not a person caves into that fear and reacts is an individual matter. The way they react is also an individual matter. But the reaction is not based on hate; it's based on fear. No one wants to die. Where and when did it become correct to make the words "fear" and "hate" synonyms?

I think it is prejudicial and mean-spirited to automatically label someone who is afraid as a hater, a bigot, a racist and warmonger. It's just not logical. It's an equally emotional and animal level adjutant type of thinking, in my opinion, and also sickeningly sanctimonious.

Jesus always said, "fear not," and he taught us to destroy fear by courageous living with faith in truth. First we have to have faith that there is a way to find truth and then we have to find it. Asking an Arabic speaking man boarding a plane what he's really about is looking for the truth, looking for what is really happening, attempting to connect with reality. It's no different than asking me my intentions if I show up at a movie theatre wearing a flack jacket and bulging back pack. You need to get to the truth of the matter. No way is that hate! It's dealing with fear, and that is a good thing.

In Friendshp,
Rexford


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This is not the Muslim/Islam debate board. Beginning another thread along this topic is unacceptable even if UB quotes are attached. The tolerance of the forum administration has been reached. This topic is locked... don't begin another similar one.

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