Switch to full style
A forum for issues regarding family life and child rearing.
Post a reply

Commodifying Kids: The Forgotten Crisis

Sun Oct 25, 2009 1:04 pm +0000

What kind of society and future do we want for our children given how obviously unsustainable and exploitative the now failed market-driven system has proven to be?


Friday 03 April 2009
by: Henry A. Giroux, t r u t h o u t | Perspective

http://www.truthout.org/040309J

Re: Commodifying Kids: The Forgotten Crisis

Sun Oct 25, 2009 5:59 pm +0000

That's a hard read, rhermen...but I appreciate it. Have attempted to discuss this with others, especially with some relatives who have struggled with the right choices for their children. It's been sad to watch them succumb to the manipulations of the mass market advertising, all the while believing they were giving their children what was best for them. I fear we a losing yet another generation because the previous generation was lost and actually doesn't know how to raise the children.
I have no clue how to change the tide because money is the driving force...and it is all so subtle...like mind control.

I did post the article on FB but doubt that very many will read it because it's too long and will ask that they engage their brain. To get their attention it has to be fast and to the point...they have been raised by the media so therefore~~~ :cry:

Peace
Jo

Re: Commodifying Kids: The Forgotten Crisis

Mon Oct 26, 2009 11:19 am +0000

It's a great read, but also very frustrating because there is virtually nothing we can do. It is a machine, set in place decades ago, and fine-tuned by now. It is the fundamental basis of our civilization. We are all commodities. Our worth is defined by how much we can do in service to those who govern us, how much money we can make to line their pockets. We are allowed to have just enough to make us think we are getting somewhere, but it is leading us nowhere. It is so sad I hate to think about it.

Our society worships economics. Plain and simple. It bows down to money and its power. It does this by allowing others to do their thinking for them. The UBook says wealth flows in certain well-organized channels, and alas, those channels have become Big Business, flooding the globe with a torrent of destruction. It puts a lot of pressure on the upcoming generation's idealism; no wonder drug abuse and alcoholism and suicide are rampant.

Reminds me of a saying we used to have. "Turn on, tune in, drop out." As soon as we think we have it together enough to "drop in" and try to do something about it, we get swallowed up in the machine and rendered impotent. Impotence is no fun. Better to drop out of the values of the system as much as possible and look to other standards, other meanings and values to make life worth living. It can be done; it is being done; it's the only thing that can work. But this ... this is madness. It is unsustainable. I hope.

Re: Commodifying Kids: The Forgotten Crisis

Mon Oct 26, 2009 1:09 pm +0000

Another Brick in the Wall (Compliation) Lyrics
Artist(Band):Pink Floyd

Flash

You, Yes You, Stand Still Laddie!

When we grew up and went to school, there were certain teachers who would hurt the children anyway they could
by pouring their derision upon anything we did
exposing any weakness however carefully hidden by the kids.

Out in the middle of nowhere they were home at night
their fat and psychopathic wives
Would thrash them within inches of their lives!

ooooooooooooo, oooooooo, ooooooooooo, ooooooooo, ooooooooo, ooooooooo,oooo.

We don't need no education
We don’t need no thought control
No dark sarcasm in the classroom
Teachers leave them kids alone
Hey! Teacher! Leave them kids alone!
All in all it's just another brick in the wall.
All in all you're just another brick in the wall.

(A bunch of kids singing) We don't need no education
We don’t need no thought control
No dark sarcasm in the classroom
Teachers leave them kids alone
Hey! Teacher! Leave us kids alone!
All in all it's just another brick in the wall.
All in all you're just another brick in the wall.

Spoken:
"Wrong, Guess again!
Wrong, Guess again!
If you don't eat yer meat, you can't have any pudding.
How can you have any pudding if you don't eat yer meat?
You! Yes, you behind the bikesheds, stand still laddie!"

[Sound of many TV's coming on, all on different channels]
"The Bulls are already out there"
Pink: "Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaarrrrrgh!"
"This Roman Meal bakery thought you'd like to know."

I don't need no arms around me
And I dont need no drugs to calm me.
I have seen the writing on the wall.
Don't think I need anything at all.
No! Don't think I'll need anything at all.
All in all it was all just bricks in the wall.
All in all you were all just bricks in the wall.

Flash

Re: Commodifying Kids: The Forgotten Crisis

Mon Oct 26, 2009 2:01 pm +0000

Pink Floyd was my brother's favorite musical group.

He committed suicide.

Re: Commodifying Kids: The Forgotten Crisis

Mon Oct 26, 2009 2:37 pm +0000

Once upon a time I also liked Pink Floyd. On occasion I still do...for a short period. It does conjure up old dark memories so I can't listen for long. But still...sometimes....

I'm sorry about your brother, Gerdean. Although I have friends who have suffered through that; I have no personal experience with a loved one taking their life. That must be a singular pain that no one on the outside could understand.

Peace

Re: Commodifying Kids: The Forgotten Crisis

Mon Oct 26, 2009 3:04 pm +0000

To the extent that all men are my brothers, it is simply a pain that carries over into my work with humanity. It is part of what makes me who I am. It helps motivate my drive to bring about a better world, so that Joe and other people who despair of this life can find a way to hang in there and find the joy in living. You know the saying, "Don't quit before the miracle happens"? Well, my novel, my life's work, is dedicated to those people who could not wait. Alas, a lot of them slip through the cracks, and in each instance I am inclined to feel a sense of responsibility and loss.

Re: Commodifying Kids: The Forgotten Crisis

Thu Oct 29, 2009 8:09 am +0000

Hi Everyone and thanks for the responses!

Gerdean, I am sorry to hear of your brother. Let me state that it is not my intention to promote frustration. Quite often, people who are so frustrated (and hopeless) do unfortunately commit suicide.

I am promoting awareness. Why? Because in order to heal frustration and hopelessness, people must first become aware that the situation exists. Having become aware that a situation exists, people can then make better choices for themselves and their families. People, especially parents, who visualize a more peaceful future for the human family will most likely not allow their children to be treated as a commodity or allow their kids to play video games which promote violence.

Hence, by increasing awareness and hopefully promoting the ability to make better choices for a more peaceful future, I am doing something.

Randy

Re: Commodifying Kids: The Forgotten Crisis

Thu Oct 29, 2009 4:22 pm +0000

i admit, fully, to a VERY quick perusal of this thread
and
believe that it IS, mostly, about,

how do we take in all the facts

(given what condition OUR condition is in)

and stay focused on the positive while NOT succumbing to the negative?


i PRAY

love to all,
susan

Re: Commodifying Kids: The Forgotten Crisis

Sat Jun 27, 2015 11:19 am +0000

rhermen wrote:
What kind of society and future do we want for our children given how obviously unsustainable and exploitative the now failed market-driven system has proven to be?


Friday 03 April 2009
by: Henry A. Giroux, t r u t h o u t | Perspective

http://www.truthout.org/040309J



The implication is that we want our children to depend on a market-driven system.

But we who read the Urantia Book are well-informed on the values that Joseph instructed Jesus, regarding the primacy of farming and industry over the marketplace. Market-dependence is clearly undesirable given our culture. But if we choose the marketplace as the vehicle to provide for human material necessity, then we shall fail, and we shall show an example unto the children who grow up now.

Because of American dependence on other countries' food and resources, we feel a great desperation because we intuitively prefer to eat local produce and natural foods. We may have once appreciated the convenience of these things, but if the soils become depleted, then the fruits will lose their flavor. Eventually, these goods will no longer satisfy, and it is the time to reclaim our human values as a farming society- the highest there is according to the Urantia Book.

The commodification of human individuals grew out of mercantile trade, was brought through the era of human trafficking (man is worth much more than gold) now continues through the philosophy of Ayn Rand. The era of mental slavery is akin to the human dependence on the market. At this point, the psychology of control is branded onto the prices of (National) Government-Subsidized Global Retail. The effortless availability of temporary solutions has run a deep riverbed in the current of our consciousness, so that we must rely on our thought Adjusters' guidance in order to transcend temptation.

Though the Adjuster stills temptation, we must be wary as role models not to let on examples of human behaviour that "satisfy craving", for example, so that the Children who follow our example will grow up as Gardeners and Producers of Good. In the merchant era, the seeds were more valuable to new port-plantations than anything else. This is because the seeds were not "consumed" but were put in better soils than their original lands; they were allowed to spread and thrive. Now, the marketplace has seeds that have been altered by man's own image, and therefore are corrupted. The agents of sale have gone beyond their license to now provide products instead of goods.

Therefore, this is the era of desperation where we must implant modern methods with the ancient culture of Adam and Eve who raised gardens as well as divine children. He who is worthy to multiply good fruits is worthy to rear children.

Re: Commodifying Kids: The Forgotten Crisis

Thu Mar 31, 2016 7:15 am +0000

Hmmm. I'm not so sure all of the negativity is warranted. What if the marketing machine is pushing products, tools, services, information and inspiration oriented towards building a higher, more morally aware, socially aware, more spiritually fruitful and intellectually activated culture?

Isn't the real issue that children don't often enough have available worthy role models? Or people around them who can inspire and challenge them? Or offer a fresh, realistic and vigorous positive perspective on life?

If YouTube knows that I'm a musician and throws many videos my way to advertise products that can definitely enhance the craft, I'm only glad about that. It may mean that I need to make some changes in my life to be able to afford the purchase of the product, but doing so boosts the economy. And especially boosts the industry that is supporting the development of a more refined planetary culture. :)

Re: Commodifying Kids: The Forgotten Crisis

Fri Apr 01, 2016 3:04 am +0000

Riktare wrote: the development of a more refined planetary culture.


I think you Riktare is correct, certainly, to point out that the issue is for children to have rolemodels in order for the potential to mature be cultivated. That is the beginning, and if we praise false role-models, if we ourselves fail to admit the folly of our actions, if your standard of goodness is too low, then there is no encouragement at all for these children of our nation.

If we are praising each family for having its own raised bed garden, for doing family activities, this could be common recognition or it could be false exaltation. In our encouragement and identification of good rolemodels, we must be careful to ensure that we are encouraging, and not displacing the child's own identification with both that one and ourselves.

This is to ensure that productive habits are ordinary, not exceptional. Do you think that there is fairness in the marketplace, only in the rights of man. Beyond this, there are forces of competition that have created unfair socialisation and subsidies, for one product over another. In price and in the attention it receives from the public media.

I do not think there is currently fairness because the Wall Street Journal and other national newspresses stays away from indepth accounting analysis. The focus in economics has been on point-of-sale transaction too much, on the glossy exterior of a product rather than what is contained within.

But I would refer to the overall impact of the action of an individual, a corporation, a company, and simply investigate if the goodness is a false claim, or if it authentic. What does it do for a man's soul? And does this improve the land-man ratio by raising overall yields.

You have to answer for yourself, but no making excuses; the traditional model/goal for economics in a healthy nation has always been to export more than to import. Now, I say, the evaluation of exports has shifted from manufactured goods, to "intellectual assets". The measure of value for a product cannot be self-verifying by the company's own survey/analysis. Once, in A.D. 1934 the danger was materialism. But are we more materialistic even though our corporations are "intellectually value-heavy"?

One recent farm-industry research predicted a 3% decline in overal sales of American Agricultural Goods in A.D. 2016 from A.D. 2015. But there is a slight increase in wheat-corn-barley, accompanied with a dramatic decrease in less common crops. There is a growing focus on annual crops, instead of dividend-yielding perennials. There are more small farmers who have been disestablished than ever. Such an essential economic branch receives secondary attention, but it is of primary importance.

Re: Commodifying Kids: The Forgotten Crisis

Fri Apr 01, 2016 7:24 am +0000

Interesting points SEIa_Kelly. You seem to reinforce the idea that the basis for real economic growth is the creative generation of new knowledge and new impulses in the human spirit. And driving that is of course the recognition of new meanings and values in a person. If we have unlimited potential to grow that way, than each individual or company or country doesn't diminish the reserve by increasing what they export.

Re: Commodifying Kids: The Forgotten Crisis

Fri Apr 01, 2016 12:58 pm +0000

That is a valid inference. But the idea of "new meanings and new values" is relative to the human; they are not necessarily novel in the universe. Also, the material necessity of life mechanisms should be included in the phrase.

The "new values and meanings" are unsubstantiated, and there must be evidence for the basis of an evaluation.

I do think that new technologies that serve in the place of primitive ones are overvalued. Why is a price, and not a simple qualifier, used. We ask "does it perform the same function adequately?" But then the question of durability (reusability) & efficiency are involved. How personal are the tools, are they used by only the craftsman, his pupils or children?

The value of product being measured after its useful life is completed is better. It is not the overall use, but also the number of people who had associations, its overall beneficience. It is evaluated based on its experience.

We note our own reactions to insurance analysis of children. We have had our first reaction of abhorrence. Maybe the economic analysis will cause the evaluator to have a more active interest in the growth/development of the youth. The risk is that we give our attention to those who have the most potential, instead of focusing on the differential ways that the value of a child can be improved when he matures. This is not measured by the goods given to the youth but by the skills he acquires and the understanding/appreciation he develops. The other risk is that since the duration of the human life is finite, and not always considering the morontial potential to eventuate as a spirit. If a person has enough of a positive vector in terms of value, adding value after the physical capacity is exhausted, there is indication of "infinite value potential".
Post a reply