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I tried looking up monasticism in the UB but the word monastery and the word hermit each only appear only once. Since the UB promotes the religion of personal experience, we don't have monastic orders of priests or monks.

Many religions offer monasticism as an optional lifestyle where a person lives a life of austerity giving up worldly goods, minimizing relationships (including being celibate), living off charity etc. in order to dedicate their whole life to spiritual experience. Other religions such as Islam, Baha'i and Sikhism explicitly prohibit monasticism as you are not contributing to sharing God's love with others or are dependent on others for your welfare and not pulling your weight in uplifting society.

Since the UB does not explicitly promote or prohibit monasticism, I realize it is of no importance whether you choose that lifestyle or not. HOWEVER: it does raise the question whether you should focus on connecting to your thought adjuster or help others find that connection and building a world for the era of light and life.

Is it better to go into a quiet place by yourself every day for a period of time and meditate, or is it more important to show love to others and help them realize their own spiritual experience? Of course you can do BOTH, but what does the UB place more importance on?

The book after all is brought to us for our personal spiritual experience. But does it at the same time give us a mandate to help others realize of the love of the Universal Father once the book has entered our life?


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William, with so many references to "genuine religious experience" and "personal religious experience" we might assume they are encouraged. The Master went off by himself for short times:

1 - (0:12.13) We are fully cognizant of the difficulties of our assignment; we recognize the impossibility of fully translating the language of the concepts of divinity and eternity into the symbols of the language of the finite concepts of the mortal mind. But we know that there dwells within the human mind a fragment of God, and that there sojourns with the human soul the Spirit of Truth; and we further know that these spirit forces conspire to enable material man to grasp the reality of spiritual values and to comprehend the philosophy of universe meanings. But even more certainly we know that these spirits of the Divine Presence are able to assist man in the spiritual appropriation of all truth contributory to the enhancement of the ever-progressing reality of personal religious experience—God-consciousness.

2 - (1:6.4) The prepersonal divine spirit which indwells the mortal mind carries, in its very presence, the valid proof of its actual existence, but the concept of the divine personality can be grasped only by the spiritual insight of genuine personal religious experience. Any person, human or divine, may be known and comprehended quite apart from the external reactions or the material presence of that person.

3 - (2:6.1) In the physical universe we may see the divine beauty, in the intellectual world we may discern eternal truth, but the goodness of God is found only in the spiritual world of personal religious experience. In its true essence, religion is a faith-trust in the goodness of God. God could be great and absolute, somehow even intelligent and personal, in philosophy, but in religion God must also be moral; he must be good. Man might fear a great God, but he trusts and loves only a good God. This goodness of God is a part of the personality of God, and its full revelation appears only in the personal religious experience of the believing sons of God.

4 - (5:4.14) It must therefore be evident that composite Christian theology encounters great difficulty in attaining consistency. This difficulty is further aggravated by the fact that the doctrines of early Christianity were generally based on the personal religious experience of three different persons: Philo of Alexandria, Jesus of Nazareth, and Paul of Tarsus.

5 - (86:5.2) The ghost soul could be heard and seen, but not touched. Gradually the dream life of the race so developed and expanded the activities of this evolving spirit world that death was finally regarded as "giving up the ghost." All primitive tribes, except those little above animals, have developed some concept of the soul. As civilization advances, this superstitious concept of the soul is destroyed, and man is wholly dependent on revelation and personal religious experience for his new idea of the soul as the joint creation of the God-knowing mortal mind and its indwelling divine spirit, the Thought Adjuster.

6 - (99:4.2) Social leadership is transformed by spiritual insight; religion prevents all collective movements from losing sight of their true objectives. Together with children, religion is the great unifier of family life, provided it is a living and growing faith. Family life cannot be had without children; it can be lived without religion, but such a handicap enormously multiplies the difficulties of this intimate human association. During the early decades of the twentieth century, family life, next to personal religious experience, suffers most from the decadence consequent upon the transition from old religious loyalties to the emerging new meanings and values.

7 - (99:7.5) Economic interdependence and social fraternity will ultimately conduce to brotherhood. Man is naturally a dreamer, but science is sobering him so that religion can presently activate him with far less danger of precipitating fanatical reactions. Economic necessities tie man up with reality, and personal religious experience brings this same man face to face with the eternal realities of an ever-expanding and progressing cosmic citizenship.

8 - (101:8.1) Belief has attained the level of faith when it motivates life and shapes the mode of living. The acceptance of a teaching as true is not faith; that is mere belief. Neither is certainty nor conviction faith. A state of mind attains to faith levels only when it actually dominates the mode of living. Faith is a living attribute of genuine personal religious experience. One believes truth, admires beauty, and reverences goodness, but does not worship them; such an attitude of saving faith is centered on God alone, who is all of these personified and infinitely more.

9 - (102:6.4) Faith transforms the philosophic God of probability into the saving God of certainty in the personal religious experience. Skepticism may challenge the theories of theology, but confidence in the dependability of personal experience affirms the truth of that belief which has grown into faith.

10 - (103:1.5) That religionists have believed so much that was false does not invalidate religion because religion is founded on the recognition of values and is validated by the faith of personal religious experience. Religion, then, is based on experience and religious thought; theology, the philosophy of religion, is an honest attempt to interpret that experience. Such interpretative beliefs may be right or wrong, or a mixture of truth and error.

11 - (103:8.1) Although both science and philosophy may assume the probability of God by their reason and logic, only the personal religious experience of a spirit-led man can affirm the certainty of such a supreme and personal Deity. By the technique of such an incarnation of living truth the philosophic hypothesis of the probability of God becomes a religious reality.

12 - (140:10.6) This new religion of Jesus was not without its practical implications, but whatever of practical political, social, or economic value there is to be found in his teaching is the natural outworking of this inner experience of the soul as it manifests the fruits of the spirit in the spontaneous daily ministry of genuine personal religious experience.

13 - (146:2.4) 3. By opening the human end of the channel of the God-man communication, mortals make immediately available the ever-flowing stream of divine ministry to the creatures of the worlds. When man hears God's spirit speak within the human heart, inherent in such an experience is the fact that God simultaneously hears that man's prayer. Even the forgiveness of sin operates in this same unerring fashion. The Father in heaven has forgiven you even before you have thought to ask him, but such forgiveness is not available in your personal religious experience until such a time as you forgive your fellow men. God's forgiveness in fact is not conditioned upon your forgiving your fellows, but in experience it is exactly so conditioned. And this fact of the synchrony of divine and human forgiveness was thus recognized and linked together in the prayer which Jesus taught the apostles.

14 - (146:3.4) And Jesus said to Thomas: "Your assurance that you have entered into the kingdom family of the Father, and that you will eternally survive with the children of the kingdom, is wholly a matter of personal experience—faith in the word of truth. Spiritual assurance is the equivalent of your personal religious experience in the eternal realities of divine truth and is otherwise equal to your intelligent understanding of truth realities plus your spiritual faith and minus your honest doubts.

15 - (146:3.10) The special instruction given by Jesus during their stay at Zebulun had chiefly to do with further discussions of the mutual obligations of the kingdom and embraced teaching designed to make clear the differences between personal religious experience and the amities of social religious obligations. This was one of the few times the Master ever discussed the social aspects of religion. Throughout his entire earth life Jesus gave his followers very little instruction regarding the socialization of religion.

16 - (155:5.10) And for a long time there will live on earth those timid, fearful, and hesitant individuals who will prefer thus to secure their religious consolations, even though, in so casting their lot with the religions of authority, they compromise the sovereignty of personality, debase the dignity of self-respect, and utterly surrender the right to participate in that most thrilling and inspiring of all possible human experiences: the personal quest for truth, the exhilaration of facing the perils of intellectual discovery, the determination to explore the realities of personal religious experience, the supreme satisfaction of experiencing the personal triumph of the actual realization of the victory of spiritual faith over intellectual doubt as it is honestly won in the supreme adventure of all human existence—man seeking God, for himself and as himself, and finding him.

17 - (196:2.1) Some day a reformation in the Christian church may strike deep enough to get back to the unadulterated religious teachings of Jesus, the author and finisher of our faith. You may preach a religion about Jesus, but, perforce, you must live the religion of Jesus. In the enthusiasm of Pentecost, Peter unintentionally inaugurated a new religion, the religion of the risen and glorified Christ. The Apostle Paul later on transformed this new gospel into Christianity, a religion embodying his own theologic views and portraying his own personal experience with the Jesus of the Damascus road. The gospel of the kingdom is founded on the personal religious experience of the Jesus of Galilee; Christianity is founded almost exclusively on the personal religious experience of the Apostle Paul. Almost the whole of the New Testament is devoted, not to the portrayal of the significant and inspiring religious life of Jesus, but to a discussion of Paul's religious experience and to a portrayal of his personal religious convictions. The only notable exceptions to this statement, aside from certain parts of Matthew, Mark, and Luke, are the Book of Hebrews and the Epistle of James. Even Peter, in his writing, only once reverted to the personal religious life of his Master. The New Testament is a superb Christian document, but it is only meagerly Jesusonian.

18 - (196:2.2) Jesus' life in the flesh portrays a transcendent religious growth from the early ideas of primitive awe and human reverence up through years of personal spiritual communion until he finally arrived at that advanced and exalted status of the consciousness of his oneness with the Father. And thus, in one short life, did Jesus traverse that experience of religious spiritual progression which man begins on earth and ordinarily achieves only at the conclusion of his long sojourn in the spirit training schools of the successive levels of the pre-Paradise career. Jesus progressed from a purely human consciousness of the faith certainties of personal religious experience to the sublime spiritual heights of the positive realization of his divine nature and to the consciousness of his close association with the Universal Father in the management of a universe. He progressed from the humble status of mortal dependence which prompted him spontaneously to say to the one who called him Good Teacher, "Why do you call me good? None is good but God," to that sublime consciousness of achieved divinity which led him to exclaim, "Which one of you convicts me of sin?" And this progressing ascent from the human to the divine was an exclusively mortal achievement. And when he had thus attained divinity, he was still the same human Jesus, the Son of Man as well as the Son of God.

19 - (196:2.4) But the greatest mistake was made in that, while the human Jesus was recognized as having a religion, the divine Jesus (Christ) almost overnight became a religion. Paul's Christianity made sure of the adoration of the divine Christ, but it almost wholly lost sight of the struggling and valiant human Jesus of Galilee, who, by the valor of his personal religious faith and the heroism of his indwelling Adjuster, ascended from the lowly levels of humanity to become one with divinity, thus becoming the new and living way whereby all mortals may so ascend from humanity to divinity. Mortals in all stages of spirituality and on all worlds may find in the personal life of Jesus that which will strengthen and inspire them as they progress from the lowest spirit levels up to the highest divine values, from the beginning to the end of all personal religious experience.

20 - (196:3.17) Moral evaluation with a religious meaning—spiritual insight—connotes the individual's choice between good and evil, truth and error, material and spiritual, human and divine, time and eternity. Human survival is in great measure dependent on consecrating the human will to the choosing of those values selected by this spirit-value sorter—the indwelling interpreter and unifier. Personal religious experience consists in two phases: discovery in the human mind and revelation by the indwelling divine spirit. Through oversophistication or as a result of the irreligious conduct of professed religionists, a man, or even a generation of men, may elect to suspend their efforts to discover the God who indwells them; they may fail to progress in and attain the divine revelation. But such attitudes of spiritual nonprogression cannot long persist because of the presence and influence of the indwelling Thought Adjusters.


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William...great question and topic!!

We are mandated 'servants'...not teachers or preachers or the soul savers of others or the planetary saviors.

The love of God is a circuit...it flows with a current...and is best received and personally activated when transferred from one personality to another. We may not hold it or contain it for ourselves or our exclusive utilization...it must be passed on. The Beatles got it right....And in the end...The love you take is equal to the love you make!

We are also taught that social isolation is an error with serious consequences and that we should socialize with many different people of different philosophy and perspective and belief and culture and those who disagree with us and may not like us. Why? To experience more than our own subjective experience. We are to seek and learn objectivity! We are to find the similarity of humanity and soul and the Spirit within the differences and individualism of each being we encounter.

Experiential wisdom is the quest of the ages to come...and this life as well. Consider the story of Jesus in Part IV...his adventure of discovery and the rich and diverse experiences and skills and knowledge he sought out and his love of meeting new people and always asking questions. Even though he was a teacher and preacher, I think Jesus asked 4-5 times, maybe 10 times more questions than statements and proclamations made. The question was a primary way for him to both learn from and also to teach others!

Sharing and caring are huge aspects and functional elements to personal religious experience. No isolated, self centered, subjective person can possibly make the same spirit progress as someone who works with others to achieve mutually beneficial outcomes in both material and non-material arenas of being and living. Even our prayer and praise lives are said to be protected from egoism and subjectivity by group pray and song and celebration and worship.

Such service to and love of others and sharing and caring IS that personal experience which attaches our branch to the vine and brings forth the fruit of the Spirit...joy, happiness, kindness, patience, affection, helpfulness. It is these fruits that demonstrate our personal religious experience and progress. It is also these fruits of the Divine Spirit which are our public testimony and example which does attract others, help others in their own situations of growth, serve and change our world, lead others to the spirit within, makes us teachers, and ministers to others and to our world.

Lots of text available in support of the above. Be back with some soon..... 8)


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William S. wrote:
I tried looking up monasticism in the UB but the word monastery and the word hermit each only appear only once. Since the UB promotes the religion of personal experience, we don't have monastic orders of priests or monks.Many religions offer monasticism as an optional lifestyle where a person lives a life of austerity giving up worldly goods, minimizing relationships (including being celibate), living off charity etc. in order to dedicate their whole life to spiritual experience. Other religions such as Islam, Baha'i and Sikhism explicitly prohibit monasticism as you are not contributing to sharing God's love with others or are dependent on others for your welfare and not pulling your weight in uplifting society.


I think you're talking about asceticism rather than monasticism. Jesus was against asceticism.

(1512.7) 136:3.3 Jesus did not go into retirement for the purpose of fasting and for the affliction of his soul. He was not an ascetic, and he came forever to destroy all such notions regarding the approach to God.

Monasticism is not always ascetic in practice. There are many monastic orders who serve their communities as teachers and priests.

William S. wrote:
Since the UB does not explicitly promote or prohibit monasticism, I realize it is of no importance whether you choose that lifestyle or not. HOWEVER: it does raise the question whether you should focus on connecting to your thought adjuster or help others find that connection and building a world for the era of light and life. Is it better to go into a quiet place by yourself every day for a period of time and meditate, or is it more important to show love to others and help them realize their own spiritual experience? Of course you can do BOTH, but what does the UB place more importance on?


Jesus taught both. He had his apostles alternate between worship and service. He kept the worship periods short and service contact long.

(1616.5) 143:7.3 Worship — contemplation of the spiritual — must alternate with service, contact with material reality.

(1000.3) 91:7.2 The great religious teachers and the prophets of past ages were not extreme mystics. They were God-knowing men and women who best served their God by unselfish ministry to their fellow mortals. Jesus often took his apostles away by themselves for short periods to engage in meditation and prayer, but for the most part he kept them in service-contact with the multitudes. The soul of man requires spiritual exercise as well as spiritual nourishment.

William S. wrote:
The book after all is brought to us for our personal spiritual experience. But does it at the same time give us a mandate to help others realize of the love of the Universal Father once the book has entered our life?


If Jesus enters your life, there is a natural desire to serve others. It can't be avoided. One naturally leads to the other.

(1769:10) Jesus' religion consisted not merely in believing, but in actually doing, those things which the gospel required. He did not teach that the essence of his religion consisted in social service, but rather that social service was one of the certain effects of the possession of the spirit of true religion.


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fanofVan wrote:
William...great question and topic!!

We are mandated 'servants'...not teachers or preachers or the soul savers of others or the planetary saviors.

The love of God is a circuit...it flows with a current...and is best received and personally activated when transferred from one personality to another. We may not hold it or contain it for ourselves or our exclusive utilization...it must be passed on. The Beatles got it right....And in the end...The love you take is equal to the love you make!

We are also taught that social isolation is an error with serious consequences and that we should socialize with many different people of different philosophy and perspective and belief and culture and those who disagree with us and may not like us. Why? To experience more than our own subjective experience. We are to seek and learn objectivity! We are to find the similarity of humanity and soul and the Spirit within the differences and individualism of each being we encounter.

Experiential wisdom is the quest of the ages to come...and this life as well. Consider the story of Jesus in Part IV...his adventure of discovery and the rich and diverse experiences and skills and knowledge he sought out and his love of meeting new people and always asking questions. Even though he was a teacher and preacher, I think Jesus asked 4-5 times, maybe 10 times more questions than statements and proclamations made. The question was a primary way for him to both learn from and also to teach others!

Sharing and caring are huge aspects and functional elements to personal religious experience. No isolated, self centered, subjective person can possibly make the same spirit progress as someone who works with others to achieve mutually beneficial outcomes in both material and non-material arenas of being and living. Even our prayer and praise lives are said to be protected from egoism and subjectivity by group pray and song and celebration and worship.

Such service to and love of others and sharing and caring IS that personal experience which attaches our branch to the vine and brings forth the fruit of the Spirit...joy, happiness, kindness, patience, affection, helpfulness. It is these fruits that demonstrate our personal religious experience and progress. It is also these fruits of the Divine Spirit which are our public testimony and example which does attract others, help others in their own situations of growth, serve and change our world, lead others to the spirit within, makes us teachers, and ministers to others and to our world.

Lots of text available in support of the above. Be back with some soon..... 8)


Great response. Thanks.

Looking forward to those references! So in short, we are neither isolationists nor teachers but the answer is personal experience to be found among others! And the spiritual fruit we bear helps others find their own experience.


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Well....if you don't want to be wordy like me and want to be precise and accurate.....well then yeah...that's it. Hahaha....Even

We all teach the truth that we live and express.


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fanofVan wrote:
William...great question and topic!!

Sharing and caring are huge aspects and functional elements to personal religious experience. No isolated, self centered, subjective person can possibly make the same spirit progress as someone who works with others to achieve mutually beneficial outcomes in both material and non-material arenas of being and living. Even our prayer and praise lives are said to be protected from egoism and subjectivity by group pray and song and celebration and worship.


126:3.14 The uniqueness of the unusual situation compelled him to bear his burdens alone.
131:4.2 God is one God; he is alone and by himself; he is the only one. And this one God is our Maker and the last destiny of the soul.
131:4.8 Man's friends of the flesh cannot survive death; virtue alone walks by man's side as he journeys ever onward toward the gladsome and sunlit fields of Paradise.
134:4.4 "God alone is spirit sovereign."

134:8.2 "He requested that he be permitted to go up to his last struggle with the realities of mortal existence alone."

Beyond the Counsel of man, Riktare, I hope that you find wisdom to deal with the tasks of your personal virtue, in the manner that you see fit. There is no such thing as "group worship"; the best advice and knowledge that mankind has to offer, cannot compel you to do this, to worship God as an individual.

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SEla_Kelly wrote:
fanofVan wrote:
William...great question and topic!!

Sharing and caring are huge aspects and functional elements to personal religious experience. No isolated, self centered, subjective person can possibly make the same spirit progress as someone who works with others to achieve mutually beneficial outcomes in both material and non-material arenas of being and living. Even our prayer and praise lives are said to be protected from egoism and subjectivity by group pray and song and celebration and worship.


126:3.14 The uniqueness of the unusual situation compelled him to bear his burdens alone.
131:4.2 God is one God; he is alone and by himself; he is the only one. And this one God is our Maker and the last destiny of the soul.
131:4.8 Man's friends of the flesh cannot survive death; virtue alone walks by man's side as he journeys ever onward toward the gladsome and sunlit fields of Paradise.
134:4.4 "God alone is spirit sovereign."

134:8.2 "He requested that he be permitted to go up to his last struggle with the realities of mortal existence alone."

Beyond the Counsel of man, Riktare, I hope that you find wisdom to deal with the tasks of your personal virtue, in the manner that you see fit. There is no such thing as "group worship"; the best advice and knowledge that mankind has to offer, cannot compel you to do this, to worship God as an individual.


First of all...it's William, not Riktare, you are addressing.

So then, you are recommending isolation? And you believe these quotes above teach us to be alone and isolated? Let us examine these beliefs of yours which once again are contrary to and contradict the Revelation!!

91:5.2 (998.5) But prayer need not always be individual. Group or congregational praying is very effective in that it is highly socializing in its repercussions. When a group engages in community prayer for moral enhancement and spiritual uplift, such devotions are reactive upon the individuals composing the group; they are all made better because of participation. Even a whole city or an entire nation can be helped by such prayer devotions. Confession, repentance, and prayer have led individuals, cities, nations, and whole races to mighty efforts of reform and courageous deeds of valorous achievement.

99:6.2 (1092.2) There is a real purpose in the socialization of religion. It is the purpose of group religious activities to dramatize the loyalties of religion; to magnify the lures of truth, beauty, and goodness; to foster the attractions of supreme values; to enhance the service of unselfish fellowship; to glorify the potentials of family life; to promote religious education; to provide wise counsel and spiritual guidance; and to encourage group worship. And all live religions encourage human friendship, conserve morality, promote neighborhood welfare, and facilitate the spread of the essential gospel of their respective messages of eternal salvation.

103:4.1 (1133.1) The characteristic difference between a social occasion and a religious gathering is that in contrast with the secular the religious is pervaded by the atmosphere of communion. In this way human association generates a feeling of fellowship with the divine, and this is the beginning of group worship. Partaking of a common meal was the earliest type of social communion, and so did early religions provide that some portion of the ceremonial sacrifice should be eaten by the worshipers. Even in Christianity the Lord’s Supper retains this mode of communion. The atmosphere of the communion provides a refreshing and comforting period of truce in the conflict of the self-seeking ego with the altruistic urge of the indwelling spirit Monitor. And this is the prelude to true worship—the practice of the presence of God which eventuates in the emergence of the brotherhood of man.

100:0.2 (1094.2) Spiritual growth is mutually stimulated by intimate association with other religionists. Love supplies the soil for religious growth—an objective lure in the place of subjective gratification—yet it yields the supreme subjective satisfaction. And religion ennobles the commonplace drudgery of daily living.

100:4.6 (1098.3) You cannot truly love your fellows by a mere act of the will. Love is only born of thoroughgoing understanding of your neighbor’s motives and sentiments. It is not so important to love all men today as it is that each day you learn to love one more human being. If each day or each week you achieve an understanding of one more of your fellows, and if this is the limit of your ability, then you are certainly socializing and truly spiritualizing your personality. Love is infectious, and when human devotion is intelligent and wise, love is more catching than hate. But only genuine and unselfish love is truly contagious. If each mortal could only become a focus of dynamic affection, this benign virus of love would soon pervade the sentimental emotion-stream of humanity to such an extent that all civilization would be encompassed by love, and that would be the realization of the brotherhood of man.

5:4.1 (66.5) The morality of the religions of evolution drives men forward in the God quest by the motive power of fear. The religions of revelation allure men to seek for a God of love because they crave to become like him. But religion is not merely a passive feeling of “absolute dependence” and “surety of survival”; it is a living and dynamic experience of divinity attainment predicated on humanity service.

5:4.3 (67.1) God is not only the determiner of destiny; he is man’s eternal destination. All nonreligious human activities seek to bend the universe to the distorting service of self; the truly religious individual seeks to identify the self with the universe and then to dedicate the activities of this unified self to the service of the universe family of fellow beings, human and superhuman.

5:4.3 (67.1) God is not only the determiner of destiny; he is man’s eternal destination. All nonreligious human activities seek to bend the universe to the distorting service of self; the truly religious individual seeks to identify the self with the universe and then to dedicate the activities of this unified self to the service of the universe family of fellow beings, human and superhuman.

5:4.5 (67.3) All religions teach the worship of Deity and some doctrine of human salvation. The Buddhist religion promises salvation from suffering, unending peace; the Jewish religion promises salvation from difficulties, prosperity predicated on righteousness; the Greek religion promised salvation from disharmony, ugliness, by the realization of beauty; Christianity promises salvation from sin, sanctity; Mohammedanism provides deliverance from the rigorous moral standards of Judaism and Christianity. The religion of Jesus is salvation from self, deliverance from the evils of creature isolation in time and in eternity.

5:4.6 (67.4) The Hebrews based their religion on goodness; the Greeks on beauty; both religions sought truth. Jesus revealed a God of love, and love is all-embracing of truth, beauty, and goodness.

5:4.7 (67.5) The Zoroastrians had a religion of morals; the Hindus a religion of metaphysics; the Confucianists a religion of ethics. Jesus lived a religion of service. All these religions are of value in that they are valid approaches to the religion of Jesus. Religion is destined to become the reality of the spiritual unification of all that is good, beautiful, and true in human experience.

I'll be back with more!!! Isolation is spirit poison and soon leads to the ignorance and prejudice and love of self that some might find displayed here....just sayin'.......

The UB is filled with the advice to socialize and to learn from others and the Master's life portrayed so beautifully is certainly a testament to that very important reality!!! Careful from whence and from whom we take advice!

:wink: :biggrin: 8)


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SEla_Kelly wrote:
There is no such thing as "group worship"; the best advice and knowledge that mankind has to offer, cannot compel you to do this, to worship God as an individual.


I think group worship is not the same as true worship, but both are useful and important. Group worship is a form of social communion, sharing the religious life with others. True worship is a personal relationship with Deity, a Father-son or Creator-creature communion.

(1133.1) 103:4.1 The characteristic difference between a social occasion and a religious gathering is that in contrast with the secular the religious is pervaded by the atmosphere of communion. In this way human association generates a feeling of fellowship with the divine, and this is the beginning of group worship. Partaking of a common meal was the earliest type of social communion, and so did early religions provide that some portion of the ceremonial sacrifice should be eaten by the worshipers. Even in Christianity the Lord’s Supper retains this mode of communion. The atmosphere of the communion provides a refreshing and comforting period of truce in the conflict of the self-seeking ego with the altruistic urge of the indwelling spirit Monitor. And this is the prelude to true worship — the practice of the presence of God which eventuates in the emergence of the brotherhood of man.

(1092.2) 99:6.2 There is a real purpose in the socialization of religion. It is the purpose of group religious activities to dramatize the loyalties of religion; to magnify the lures of truth, beauty, and goodness; to foster the attractions of supreme values; to enhance the service of unselfish fellowship; to glorify the potentials of family life; to promote religious education; to provide wise counsel and spiritual guidance; and to encourage group worship. And all live religions encourage human friendship, conserve morality, promote neighborhood welfare, and facilitate the spread of the essential gospel of their respective messages of eternal salvation.

(66.4) 5:3.8 The worship experience consists in the sublime attempt of the betrothed Adjuster to communicate to the divine Father the inexpressible longings and the unutterable aspirations of the human soul — the conjoint creation of the God-seeking mortal mind and the God-revealing immortal Adjuster. Worship is, therefore, the act of the material mind’s assenting to the attempt of its spiritualizing self, under the guidance of the associated spirit, to communicate with God as a faith son of the Universal Father.


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Okay True Katro. I was caught up in the idea of the dogs that I have seen, bow themselves in a gesture of their masters' prayerfulness, and thinking about how if prostrating yourself become a culturally mandated pasttime, then even the palms pressed together, or a man on his knees like a seed/embryo, not enough to indicate that a man actually worships. When a congregation recites a formal prayer, but what about the subconscious mind, pretty good evidence that worship must be sincere. Sorry; you're right! Thanks for bearing such distinction with patience.

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to the Underlaying Unity of All Life so that the Voice of Intuition may guide Us closer to Our Common Keeper


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You're welcome.

:wink:

How does one serve others...alone and isolated? Love literally invades our being as we give it to another.

True progress in the Spirit happens during such times.

8:1.11 (92.1) It is enough of a reach of the material mind of the children of time to conceive of the Father in eternity. We know that any child can best relate himself to reality by first mastering the relationships of the child-parent situation and then by enlarging this concept to embrace the family as a whole. Subsequently the growing mind of the child will be able to adjust to the concept of family relations, to relationships of the community, the race, and the world, and then to those of the universe, the superuniverse, even the universe of universes.

28:5.13 (311.5) 3. The Union of Souls.Completing the triune staff of attachment to the Perfectors of Wisdom, are these reflectors of the ideals and status of ethical relationships. Of all the problems in the universe requiring an exercise of the consummate wisdom of experience and adaptability, none are more important than those arising out of the relationships and associations of intelligent beings. Whether in human associations of commerce and trade, friendship and marriage, or in the liaisons of the angelic hosts, there continue to arise petty frictions, minor misunderstandings too trivial even to engage the attention of conciliators but sufficiently irritating and disturbing to mar the smooth working of the universe if they were allowed to multiply and continue. Therefore do the Perfectors of Wisdom make available the wise experience of their order as the “oil of reconciliation” for an entire superuniverse. In all this work these wise men of the superuniverses are ably seconded by their reflective associates, the Unions of Souls, who make available current information regarding the status of the universe and concurrently portray the Paradise ideal of the best adjustment of these perplexing problems. When not specifically directionized elsewhere, these seconaphim remain in reflective liaison with the interpreters of ethics on Paradise.

28:5.14 (312.1) These are the angels who foster and promote the teamwork of all Orvonton. One of the most important lessons to be learned during your mortal career is teamwork. The spheres of perfection are manned by those who have mastered this art of working with other beings. Few are the duties in the universe for the lone servant. The higher you ascend, the more lonely you become when temporarily without the association of your fellows. *

39:3.7 (433.1) 4. Ethical Sensitizers. It is the mission of these seraphim to foster and to promote the growth of creature appreciation of the morality of interpersonal relationships, for such is the seed and secret of the continued and purposeful growth of society and government, human or superhuman. ...

112:5.22 (1235.4) The Thought Adjuster will recall and rehearse for you only those memories and experiences which are a part of, and essential to, your universe career. If the Adjuster has been a partner in the evolution of aught in the human mind, then will these worth-while experiences survive in the eternal consciousness of the Adjuster. But much of your past life and its memories, having neither spiritual meaning nor morontia value, will perish with the material brain; much of material experience will pass away as onetime scaffolding which, having bridged you over to the morontia level, no longer serves a purpose in the universe. But personality and the relationshipsbetween personalities are never scaffolding; mortal memory of personality relationships has cosmic value and will persist. On the mansion worlds you will know and be known, and more, you will remember, and be remembered by, your onetime associates in the short but intriguing life on Urantia.


Last edited by fanofVan on Tue Jul 30, 2019 5:38 am +0000, edited 1 time in total.

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SEla_Kelly wrote:
Okay True Katro. I was caught up in the idea of the dogs that I have seen, bow themselves in a gesture of their masters' prayerfulness, and thinking about how if prostrating yourself become a culturally mandated pasttime, then even the palms pressed together, or a man on his knees like a seed/embryo, not enough to indicate that a man actually worships. When a congregation recites a formal prayer, but what about the subconscious mind, pretty good evidence that worship must be sincere. Sorry; you're right! Thanks for bearing such distinction with patience.


But you are right. Group worship is not a substitute for true worship. In fact, group worship can be the easy way out for the mediocre, those lacking the courage to develop a personal relationship with the Father. How many times are we reminded in the Revelation that organized religion can be a false shelter against the rigors of an active religious life?

(1120:4)  102:2.7 Evolutionary man does not naturally relish hard work. To keep pace in his life experience with the impelling demands and the compelling urges of a growing religious experience means incessant activity in spiritual growth, intellectual expansion, factual enlargement, and social service. There is no real religion apart from a highly active personality. Therefore do the more indolent of men often seek to escape the rigors of truly religious activities by a species of ingenious self-deception through resorting to a retreat to the false shelter of stereotyped religious doctrines and dogmas. But true religion is alive. Intellectual crystallization of religious concepts is the equivalent of spiritual death. You cannot conceive of religion without ideas, but when religion once becomes reduced only to an idea, it is no longer religion; it has become merely a species of human philosophy.


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As we are taught in all things William, balance is key. We need other people and personalities and relationships and we need discovery and learning knowledge and skills and accomplishments and uncertainties and we need employment and material wisdom, but certainly do we also need private and quiet times with God in prayer and communion and reflection.

But religious experience and growth may happen in all such activities if we are properly aligned in mind and spirit.


Last edited by fanofVan on Tue Jul 30, 2019 8:52 am +0000, edited 1 time in total.

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I couldn't have put it better myself. Thanks.

Question thoroughly answered! Although you are more than welcome to tell me more of course! 8)


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