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 Post subject: CALI-phate / CALI-gastia
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The Revelators use the English language like a paintbrush to present ideas or imply things like nobody has ever done before nor since. I'm sure anyone who has studied the Urantia Book will agree with me. It is this fact that sets it appart as a unique literary work and makes it clear the authorship of the Urantia Book is superhuman.

The use of the prefix CALI- for the name of our traitorous planetary prince and the word CALI-phate, do you think an implication is intended? Is this a coincidence, or is this a message?

What about CALI-fornia?


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And there's Kali Yuga. In Vedic-Hindu sacred text it is the final age of a long, long cycle in which pandemonium and the eventual destruction of the Earth and Universe ensues. According to those writings we entered that age some thousands of years ago.

Kali in Sanskrit can mean very many things such as night, discord, defamation, abuse.

http://spokensanskrit.de/index.php?scri ... rection=AU


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But you're applying an unconventional method of interpretation to TUB which is frowned upon here. And if you entertain this method then in all fairness it could be applied to other unusual terms in TUB, as well. BTW, I am opened to such ideas.

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Greetings nod,

You ask:
nodAmanaV wrote:
What about CALI-fornia?


What about CALI-co kittens?

Tinfoil Hats for All!
Rexford


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Hey! I live in CALI-fornia! I know what I'm talking about.

SuperCALIfragilisticexpialidocious!


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Caliphate is an English transliteration of the Arabic word khilāfa. Arabic is a Semitic language, with very different roots than English, being a hodgepodge of Indo-European languages, mostly Germanic and Latin. In my studies, I have found the choice of new words the revelators synthesize accordingly tend to have Latin or Greek roots.

So in this case, the resemblence is purely phonetic and thus in my mind, coincidence.

BTW The cali- prefix ultimately comes from Greek kalos, meaning beautiful. So the name California should make more sense now.


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Hi quil,

I only partially agree that Arabic is a semitic language. The Iranian Andites probably had a heavy hand in developing Avestan which is considered the Old Iranian language. Certain words from Avestan are coupled very closely to both Sanskrit and to the Germanic languages. That is, they actually came from the natural linguistic tendencies of the Adamite-Andites. But yes, modern Arabic, just as the Hittite language is very. very much a Semitic-Andonite language.

By the way, it is quite possible to tease out the Saxon element from Old English because there are many references to Old English terms that are very close to Old Norse, Old Frisian and modern Scandinavian. The core word vocabulary of Old English, Old Frisian, Old Norse, modern Danish, modern Swedish, modern Dutch and modern Frisian is amazingly consistent and often matches closely with Gothic, Sanskrit and sometimes Lithuanian, Avestan and Tocharian.

Greek, Roman and Celtic language families can be shown to be more loosely coupled to the common words of a Germanic-Indo-European language framework. There are the derivative languages, not the Germanic ones. I know that pronouncement goes much further than current PIE understanding, but the evidence is there waiting to be picked up on....


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Riktare,

Thank you for expanding upon the topic. Very interesting!


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Caligastia always reminds me of Caligula
for some odd reason , intuition or really
prob no real connection .

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caligula


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Greetings coop,

coop wrote:
Caligastia always reminds me of Caligula


You're not alone. Same thought occurred to me - two perverted minds with similar names. Maybe it has something to do with the word caliginous, which means dark and obscure. Actually, I remember from a History Channel documentary that caligula means "little soldier's boots". Maybe they were also dark and obscure little boots, who knows. One thing for sure, they're both creepy people.

Rex


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Linguistic teaser. :) Which of the following are equivalents and which aren't?

English: milk
Danish: maelk
Swedish: mjölk
German: milch
Dutch: melk
Frisian: molke
Old English: meolc
Old Norse: mjölk
Tocharian: malk or mälk
Lithuanian: pienas
Sanskrit: ksira
Latin: lac

We need to know that 'j' is pronouced as English 'y', 'ä' is pronounced roughly as English 'e' and 'ö' is pronounced roughly as English 'er'. In all of the Germanic languages there is little variation of the basic word, even over a period of at least the last thousand years. The Latin word is actually derived from the Celtic word for milk, which is entirely different from the Germanic word (milk in PIE is lac or glakt).

One surprise is that in ancient Tocharian (from China and very likely related to the language the Tarim Basin Andites spoke) "milk" is essentially the same as in modern English, Danish and Dutch.


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:?:


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Yes Brother Rex your correct 8)

http://www.urantiastudyaids.com/Etymolo ... -17pgs.pdf


Caligastia: (Latin) caligineus: dark, obscuring; (Latin) caligo: the darkness of
death; moral or intellectual death; darkness or dimness of sight; disturbed mental
condition; blinded in judgement; (Latin) astipulor: to join in a stipulation or
covenant; to support (he who joined the darkness?) Words like "Caligastia" and
"Urantia," as their linguistic and orthographic elements show, are syllabic
manufactures of English-Greco-Roman tincture – in a word, an Indo- European
newspeak of especial hybrid excellence is here born. "Nebadon," "Orvonton,"
"morontia," and so on, show the same phonemic stamp. "Caligastia" means
immediately "the stockinged one" or "he of the show," or foot, a "caliga" being
originally a Roman legionnaire's military sandal and later, a bishop's legging.


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Hi coop,

I fully recognize how brilliant Dr. Halvorson is. But of course that compendium is one person's research and one person's opinion. Some alternatives:

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?all ... hmode=none

calid (adj.) Look up calid at Dictionary.com
1590s, from Latin calidus "warm," from PIE root *kele- (1) "warm" (see calorie).

caliginous (adj.) Look up caliginous at Dictionary.com
1540s, from Latin caliginosus "misty," from caliginem (nominative caligo) "mistiness, darkness, fog, gloom." Related: Caliginosity.

Caligula Look up Caligula at Dictionary.com
cognomen of the third Roman emperor (12 C.E.-41 C.E.), born Gaius Caesar. The nickname is Latin, literally "little boot," given when he joined his father on military campaigns when still a toddler, in full, child-sized military gear; diminutive of caliga "heavy military shoe," which is of unknown origin.


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The problem I have with existing explanations for "Caligastia" is that they do not account for "Daligastia" -- How do the words relate? Especially since we have "Dalamatia" the Prince's city?


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