Switch to full style
An open forum for general discussions of a spiritual nature where guests and readers entertain the teachings of The Urantia Book.
Post a reply

Bringing microbes to Mars

Sat Mar 31, 2018 11:53 am +0000

the Urantia Book seem to imply urantia is the only inhabited planet in our solar system .....Paper49.2.6>>>>>> And defines the fact it can sustain life. It was inevitable Man will one day land on Mars...... My ? is....... It also is very possible we could spread our so called grems ..... initiating life?.....or do you think the life carriers would be involved it stopping .....manmade implantation !

49:2.6.Beings such as the Urantia races are classified as mid-breathers; you represent the average or typical breathing order of mortal existence. If intelligent creatures should exist on a planet with an atmosphere similar to that of your near neighbor, Venus, they would belong to the superbreather group, while those inhabiting a planet with an atmosphere as thin as that of your outer neighbor, Mars, would be denominated subbreathers.

Re: Bringing microbes to Mars

Sat Mar 31, 2018 12:11 pm +0000

I think Paper 58.1 explains that life could not be sustained without the right conditions....but what might happen if we changed the environment of mars ?

Re: Bringing microbes to Mars

Sat Mar 31, 2018 5:28 pm +0000

randall wrote:the Urantia Book seem to imply urantia is the only inhabited planet in our solar system


Further on in Paper 49 it says this about non-breathers, which could live on Mars or perhaps even on our moon:

(49:3.6) You would be more than interested in the planetary conduct of this type of mortal because such a race of beings inhabits a sphere in close proximity to Urantia.


I've thought about the term "close proximity" alot. I think it means a race of non-breathing mortals live in our solar system. To me, it's one of the most fascinating things the UB reveals and makes me wonder about all those reports of strange things seen in our skies. It also makes me think that it's only a matter of time that we make contact.

Something tells me they're probably a much older race than ours. I wonder, do they know about Michael's sojourn here? Was their world also swept up in the rebellion? Or does "close proximity" in cosmic terms, mean this race of beings are a lot farther away and do not live in our solar system. Who knows?

Re: Bringing microbes to Mars

Sat Mar 31, 2018 8:23 pm +0000

Satania is not a uniform physical system, a single astronomic unit or organization. Its 619 inhabited worlds are located in over five hundred different physical systems. Only five have more than two inhabited worlds, and of these only one has four peopled planets, while there are forty-six having two inhabited worlds. 32.2.10

Re: Bringing microbes to Mars

Tue Apr 03, 2018 12:46 am +0000

At least 2 of the moons of Jupiter may have the potential to support life. Europa and Ganymede seem clearly to be heated by tidal forces and have underground seas capped by ice. Now and then water breaks through the ice and sprays up onto it and cracking it in places. Life there would probably have no atmosphere to breath.

Re: Bringing microbes to Mars

Mon Jul 02, 2018 8:48 pm +0000

randall wrote:the Urantia Book seem to imply urantia is the only inhabited planet in our solar system .....Paper49.2.6>>>>>> And defines the fact it can sustain life. It was inevitable Man will one day land on Mars...... My ? is....... It also is very possible we could spread our so called grems ..... initiating life?.....or do you think the life carriers would be involved it stopping .....manmade implantation !

49:2.6.Beings such as the Urantia races are classified as mid-breathers; you represent the average or typical breathing order of mortal existence. If intelligent creatures should exist on a planet with an atmosphere similar to that of your near neighbor, Venus, they would belong to the superbreather group, while those inhabiting a planet with an atmosphere as thin as that of your outer neighbor, Mars, would be denominated subbreathers.

Water is only liquid on Mars between a very narrow temperature range, just going by memory, I think it's 77 to 79 degrees F. Below that temperature water is frozen as ice. Above that temperature water evaporates because of the very low atmospheric pressure. So, there is water on Mars but only for a very short time, probably seconds, every day at the equator.

There are no living microbes on Mars and if you take any there they will die.
Post a reply