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Researchers Track And Measure Electron Beams From The Sun




Image Caption: NASA's Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) observes a wide array of particles that flow toward Earth from the sun to better understand the great space weather system that connects the sun to our planet. Credit: NASA/H. Zell

Understanding weather patterns here on Earth is a complicated process, with scientists teasing apart different kinds of atmospheric movements, such as the great jet streams that can move across a whole hemisphere versus more localized, intricate flows, to create a whole picture.

Those same methods and processes are used to understand the flows of the space weather system that links the Sun and the Earth as the Sun shoots material out in all directions, creating its own version of a particle sea to fill up the solar system.

“People think of the sun as giving out light and heat,” says Ruth Skoug, a space scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, N.M. “But it is also always losing particles, losing mass.”

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You might be interested in reading Urantia Book revelation about the sun and the process of electron emissions after you read the article...

There is so much science in The Urantia Book...and so much of it is actually accessible to the average-minded person. It is wonderful to be able to have this knowledge about the subatomic world...

41:5.4 It requires more than one-half million years for an X-ray-stimulated electron to work its way from the very center of an average sun up to the solar surface, whence it starts out on its space adventure, maybe to warm an inhabited planet, to be captured by a meteor, to participate in the birth of an atom, to be attracted by a highly charged dark island of space, or to find its space flight terminated by a final plunge into the surface of a sun similar to the one of its origin.

See: Solar Radiation

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